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Seminars and Colloquiums
for the week of April 25, 2016


SPEAKER:

Farbod Shokrieh, Cornell, Monday
Yu-Ting Chen, Harvard, Tuesday
Jerry Bona, UIC, Wednesday
Elise Weir, UTK, Wednesday
Ryan Loga, UTK, Thursday
Clayton Webster, ORNL and UTK, Thursday


TEA TIME
3:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Monday, Tuesday, & Wednesday
Room: Ayres 401
Hosted By: Kevin and Chris


Monday, April 25th

ALGEBRA SEMINAR
TITLE: Invariants for Jacobians
SPEAKER: Farbod Shokrieh, Cornell
TIME: 3:35pm – 4:25pm
ROOM: Ayres 114
Associated to every smooth curve one can associate a compact group called its Jacobian. Various invariants for Jacobians (such as various (co)homologies, Hodge numbers, number of point over a finite field) are well-studied. A nodal curve maybe thought of as a limit of smooth curves. Its (generalized) Jacobian is usually not compact. However, they have various nice compactifications depending on some combinatorial data (arising from the way that irreducible components meet each other). I will describe how one can compute some very general invariants for these objects. The solution relies on some subtle combinatorial techniques. This talk is based on joint work with Alberto Bellardini.


Tuesday, April 26th

STOCHASTICS SEMINAR
TITLE: Non-uniqueness in SPDEs with non-Lipschitz noise coefficients
SPEAKER: Yu-Ting Chen, Harvard
TIME: 2:10pm – 3:25pm
ROOM: Ayres 114


Wednesday, April 27th

COMPUTATIONAL AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS (CAM) SEMINAR
TITLE: Some dynamical problems arising in blood flow
SPEAKER: Jerry Bona, UIC
TIME: 3:35pm – 4:35pm
ROOM: Ayres 113
Pulmonary arterial hypertension is an insidious disease that currently has poor prospects for treatment. In an effort to better understand this disease, a model is developed for blood flow in the relevant part of the body. The model is shown to have at least some predictive capability. A plan is then outlined for using the model in conjunction with laboratory data to begin fathoming the remodeling that is a hallmark of the condition, and which is oftentimes the cause of premature death.


ORAL SPECIALTY EXAM
SPEAKER: Elise Weir, UTK
TIME: 3:35pm – 4:35pm
ROOM: Ayres 114
Her committee consist of Professors: Thistlethwaite (Chair), Conant, and Jameson.


Thursday, April 28th

DOCTORAL DEFENSE
SPEAKER: Ryan Loga, UTK
TIME: 11:00am – 12:00pm
ROOM: Ayres 405
His committee consist of Professors: Frazier (Chair), Lind, Phan, Richter, and Guidry (Physics)

SPECIAL COLLOQUIUM
TITLE: Best s-term polynomial approximations of high-dimensional parameterized partial differential equations.
SPEAKER: Clayton Webster, ORNL and UTK
TIME: 3:40pm - 4:35pm
ROOM: Ayres 405
In this talk, we present a new generalized methodology for constructing and analyzing best s-term polynomial approximations, applicable to a wide class of parameterized PDEs with both deterministic and stochastic inputs. Such methods construct a quasi-optimal multi-index set that corresponds to the best s-terms, based on sharp estimates of the polynomial coefficients.  Our approach for analyzing the asymptotic truncation error avoids the use of the standard Stechkin inequality, but is instead based on an extension of the underlying multi-index set into a continuous domain, and then an approximation of the cardinality (number of integer multi-indices) by its Lebesgue measure. We consider several cases of d-dimensional affine and non-affine input data, and our proofs reveal sharp asymptotic error estimates in which we achieve sub-exponential convergence rates with respect to the total number of degrees of freedom.  In addition, we are also interested in high-dimensional solutions that are characterized by a rapidly decaying polynomial expansion, whose most important terms are captured by a lower (or downward closed) set.  By exploiting this fact, we also developed innovative compressed sensing techniques which impose the lower set structure, leading to a provably reduced sample complexity.  Using these approaches, the best s-term recovery is established through an improved bound for restricted isometry property for general bounded orthonormal systems.  Computational evidence complements our theory and shows the advantage of our generalized methodologies compared to existing approaches and current published results.


Friday, April 29th

NO COLLOQUIUM


If you are interested in giving or arranging a talk for one of our seminars or colloquiums, please review our calendar.

If you have questions, or a date you would like to confirm, please contact colloquium AT math DOT utk DOT edu


Past notices:

4_18_16.html

4_8_16.html

4_4_16.html

3_28_16.html

3_21_16.html

3/14/2016 - spring break

3_7_16.html

2_29_16.html

2_22_16.html

2_15_16.html

2_8_16.html

2_1_16.html

1_25_16.html

1_18_16.html

fall_15.html

 

last updated: August 2016

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