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Seminars and Colloquiums
for the week of November 26, 2018


SPEAKERS

Monday
Pawel Grzegrzolka, University of Tennessee
Tuesday
Arnab Ganguly, Louisiana State University
Giuseppe Tinaglia, King’s College London
Wednesday
Stefan Richter, University of Tennessee
Simon Praetorius, Technische Universität Dresden
Thursday
Fatima Taousser, University of Tennessee (Postdoc, Electrical Engineering)
Arnab Ganguly, Louisiana State University
Conrad Plaut, University of Tennessee
Friday
Tyler Poppenwimer, University of Tennessee (EEB graduate student)
Giuseppe Tinaglia, King’s College London
Simon Praetorius, Technische Universität Dresden


Monday, 11/26

TOPOLOGY/ GEOMETRY SEMINAR
TITLE: Coarse spaces vs coarse proximity spaces
SPEAKER: Pawel Grzegrzolka, University of Tennessee
TIME: 3:35 PM-4:25 PM
ROOM: Ayres 406
In this talk, we will investigate the relationships between coarse spaces and coarse proximity spaces. After reviewing the necessary definitions, we will discuss normality conditions of spaces capturing large-scale properties of spaces. Then, we will use a characterization of coarse proximities in terms of coarse neighborhoods to show that (under mild assumptions) coarse space structures naturally induce coarse proximity structures. Time permitting, we will also show the converse of the above statement. This is joint work with Jeremy Siegert.

Tuesday, 11/27

STOCHASTICS/PROBABILITY SEMINAR
TITLE: Approximations of invariant distribution of ergodic diffusions: CLT and moderate deviations
SPEAKER: Arnab Ganguly, Louisiana State University
TIME: 2:10 PM-3:10 PM
ROOM: Ayres 113
The talk will focus on asymptotics of inhomogeneous integral functionals of an ergodic diffusion process under the effect of discretization. In particular, fluctuations from the corresponding functionals of the invariant distribution will be analyzed through central limit theorem and moderate deviation principle. The results will be particularly useful in understanding accuracy of an Euler discretization based numerical scheme for approximating functionals of invariant distribution of an ergodic diffusion. This is an infinite-time horizon problem, and the accuracy of numerical schemes in this context are comparatively much less studied than the ones used for generating approximate trajectories of diffusions over finite time intervals. The potential applications of these results also extend to other areas

MINIMAL SURFACES SEMINAR
TITLE: Paper I, Part I
SPEAKER: Giuseppe Tinaglia, King’s College London
TIME: 3:30 PM-5:00 PM (note change)
ROOM: Ayres 121
We continue our study of stable minimal disks in a slab.

Wednesday, 11/28

ANALYSIS SEMINAR
TITLE: Factorization of functions and non-commutative analysis, 3
SPEAKER: Stefan Richter, University of Tennessee
TIME: 2:30 PM-3:20 PM
ROOM: Ayres 113
Continuation of the previous 2 talks.

COMPUTATIONAL and APPLIED MATHEMATICS (CAM) SEMINAR
TITLE: An AMDiS tutorial
SPEAKER: Simon Praetorius, Technische Universität Dresden
TIME: 3:35 PM-4:35 PM
ROOM: Ayres 113
AMDiS (Adaptive MultiDimensional Simulations) is a C++ library to solve a broad class of partial differential equations (PDE) using adaptive finite elements.

This will be a series (of 3) hands on tutorials on its use.

Note the nonstandard time(s) and place(s).

Thursday, 11/29

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS SEMINAR
TITLE: Stability of Dynamical Systems In Non-Uniform Time Domain
SPEAKER: Fatima Taousser, University of Tennessee (Postdoc, Electrical Engineering)
TIME: 2:10 PM-3:10 PM
ROOM: Ayres 113

MATHEMATICAL DATA SCIENCE SEMINAR
TITLE: A variational approach to path estimation and parameter inference of hidden diffusion processes.
SPEAKER: Arnab Ganguly, Louisiana State University
TIME: 2:10 PM-3:10 PM
ROOM: Ayres 405
The talk will focus on a variational approach to estimation of states of a hidden diffusion process given some noisy observations. The objective is to approximate the smoothing density by an appropriate member of an exponential family. This approach then leads to an efficient scheme for estimating unknown parameters of diffusion processes.

JR. COLLOQUIUM
TITLE: A Panel Discussion on Research Opportunities for Undergraduates in Mathematics and Other STEM Fields
TIME: 3:40 PM-4:35 PM
ROOM: Ayres 405
This discussion is co-organized with the Math Club.

GEOMETRIC ANALYSIS SEMINAR
TITLE: Introduction to Discrete Homotopy Theory
SPEAKER: Conrad Plaut, University of Tennessee
TIME: 4:05 PM-5:05 PM
ROOM: Ayres 121
In a metric space, discrete homotopy theory means replacing curves and homotopies by discrete analogs called $\varepsilon$-chains and $\varepsilon$-homotopies. One can then imitate the construction of the universal covering space to produce covering spaces, called $\varepsilon $-covers, with deck groups $\pi _{\varepsilon }(X)$ that are a kind of fundamental group at the scale of $\varepsilon >0$. This kind of construction, and an equivalent one by Sormani-Wei, have various mathematical applications related to geometric analysis such as finiteness theorems for the fundamental group and the ability to define spectra related to the length spectrum (lengths of closed geodesics) in spaces such as fractals with resistance metrics in which all non-constant curves have infinite length. Various new questions are opened up concerning the relationship between these spectra and the Laplace spectrum for Riemannian manifolds. This will be purely an introductory talk, fully understandable to anyone who knows what metric spaces and covering spaces are. If there is interest I can go more deeply into the topics in future talks, and discuss open questions that might be of interest to graduate students and other faculty. Some of work is joint with Valera Berestovskii and my former student Jay Wilkins.

Friday, 11/30

MATH BIOLOGY SEMINAR
TITLE: TBA
SPEAKER: Tyler Poppenwimer, University of Tennessee (EEB graduate student)
TIME: 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
ROOM: Ayres 401

COLLOQUIUM
TITLE: Soap films, soap bubbles and the theory of constant mean curvature surfaces.
SPEAKER: Giuseppe Tinaglia, King’s College London
TIME: 3:35 PM-4:35 PM
ROOM: Ayres 405
I will talk about a few classical problems related to the geometry of soap films and soap bubbles, and the theory of constant mean curvature surfaces. They are the Plateau problem, the Kelvin problem, the isoperimetric problem and the motorway problem. I will also talk about recent results on the geometry of surfaces embedded in Euclidean space with constant mean curvature.

COMPUTATIONAL and APPLIED MATHEMATICS (CAM) SEMINAR
TITLE: An AMDiS tutorial
SPEAKER: Simon Praetorius, Technische Universität Dresden
TIME: 3:35 PM-5:00 PM
ROOM: Ayres G013
AMDiS (Adaptive MultiDimensional Simulations) is a C++ library to solve a broad class of partial differential equations (PDE) using adaptive finite elements.

This will be the second (of 3) hands on tutorials on its use.



If you are interested in giving or arranging a talk for one of our seminars or colloquiums, please review our calendar.

If you have questions, or a date you would like to confirm, please contact mlangfo5@utk.edu


Past notices:

Nov. 19, 2018

Nov. 12, 2018

Nov. 5, 2018

Oct. 29, 2018

Oct. 22, 2018

Oct. 15, 2018

Oct. 8, 2018

Oct. 1, 2018

Sept. 24, 2018

Sept. 17, 2018

Sept. 10, 2018

Sept. 3, 2018

Aug. 27, 2018

2017-18

 

last updated: November 2018

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