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The University of Tennessee

Mathematics Department

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Seminars and Colloquiums
for 2010-2011

Week of March 21, 2011


Speaker:
Prof. Steffen Rohde, University of Washington, Monday --CANCELED
Matt Bailey, Tuesday
Professor Dongbin Xiu, Purdue, Tuesday
Mr. Nick Gewecke, Tuesday
Professor Seddik Djouadi, EECS Department, UTK, Wednesday
Professor Carl Sundberg, Wednesday
Prof. Mike Langston, EECS Department, UTK, Thursday

 


If you are interested in giving or arranging a talk for one of our seminars or colloquiums,
please review our calendar.

If you have questions, or a date you would like to confirm, please contact Dr. Fernando Schwartz.


Monday, March 21

COLLOQUIUM -- CANCELED
TIME: 3:35 - 4:25 p.m.
ROOM: Ayres 114
SPEAKER: Prof. Steffen Rohde, University of Washington
TITLE: "Random curves and random maps"
ABSTRACT: How does a path of length n on the two dimensional square lattice Z^2, chosen uniformly
at random among all such paths, look like? How does it look if the path is required to have no self-
intersections? The last decade has seen tremendous progress towards understanding a variety of
lattice processes, largely due to Oded Schramm's Stochastic Loewner Evolution SLE and the use of
conformal mappings. In this talk, aimed at the non-specialist, I will describe some highlights of this
theory. I will also address recent developments related to random planar maps (such as triangulations
of the sphere), and will discuss open questions. Title: Random curves and random maps
Abstract: How does a path of length n on the two dimensional square lattice Z^2, chosen uniformly at
random among all such paths, look like? How does it look if the path is required to have no self-
intersections? The last decade has seen tremendous progress towards understanding a variety of
lattice processes, largely due to Oded Schramm's Stochastic Loewner Evolution SLE and the use of
conformal mappings. In this talk, aimed at the non-specialist, I will describe some highlights of this
theory. I will also address recent developments related to random planar maps (such as triangulations
of the sphere), and will discuss open questions.


Tuesday, March 22

MATH BIOLOGY SEMINAR
TIME: 9:45 - 10:35 a.m.
ROOM: NIMBioS Classroom
SPEAKER: Matt Bailey
TITLE: "Biological Applications of Continuous Markov Chains"

COLLOQUIUM
TIME: 10:00 - 10:50 a.m.
ROOM: Ayres 405
SPEAKER: Professor Dongbin Xiu
TITLE: "Uncertainty Analysis for Complex Systems: Algorithms beyond Polynomial Chaos"
ABSTRACT: The field of uncertainty quantification has received increasing amount of attention recently. Extensive research efforts have been devoted to it and many novel numerical techniques have been developed. These techniques aim to conduct stochastic simulations for large-scale complex systems. In this talk we will review one of the most widely approaches -- generalized polynomial chaos (gPC). The gPC methods employ orthogonal polynomials in random space and take advantage of the solution smoothness (whenever possible). The features of various gPC numerical schemes will be reviewed. Furthermore, we will discuss some of the highly efficient algorithms that are based on gPC and effective for simulations beyond uncertainty propagation. These algorithms are applicable for problems such as inverse inference, data assimilation, reliability analysis, etc.

DOCTORAL DEFENSE
TIME: 11:00 a.m.
ROOM: Ayres Hall 406
SPEAKER: Mr. Nicholas Gewecke
TITLE: "Dynamics of Mushy Layers on a Finite Domain"
His committee consists of Professors: Schulze (chair), Alexiades, Lenhart, Gao (Materials Science).


Wednesday, March 23

APPLIED/COMPUTATIONAL MATH
TIME: 3:35 - 4:30 p.m.
ROOM: Ayres 111
SPEAKER: Professor Seddik Djouadi, EECS Department, UTK
TITLE: "On the Connection Between Model Reduction and Metric Complexity Theory"
ABSTRACT: The connection between two important model reduction techniques, namely balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and balanced truncation is investigated for infinite dimensional systems. In particular, balanced POD is shown to be optimal in the sense of distance minimization in a space of integral operators. Balanced truncation
is shown to be a particular case of balanced POD for infinite dimensional systems for which the impulse response satisfies certain finite energy constraints. Balanced POD and balanced truncation are related to certain notions of metric complexity theory. In particular both are shown to minimize different n-widths including the Kolmogorov, Gelfand, and linear n-widths. The n-widths quantify inherent and representation errors due to lack of data and loss of information.

ANALYSIS SEMINAR
TIME: 3:35 - 4:25 p.m.
ROOM: Ayres 114
SPEAKER: Professor Carl Sundberg
TOPIC: "The Dirac - Kadison/Singer - Paving - Feichtinger - Seip - Sundberg Conjectures"
ABSTRACT: I'm not kidding about this. The same type of question has arisen in many different areas, such as Quantum Mechanics, C*-Algebra Theory, Frame Theory, and Function-Theoretic Operator Theory (notice that I have shamelessly added my own name to this list). I will discuss these questions and their interrelations.

Thursday, March 24

JUNIOR COLLOQUIUM
TIME: 3:35 - 4:25 p.m.
ROOM: Ayres 405
SPEAKER: Prof. Mike Langston
TITLE: TBA
ABSTRACT: TBA

Please come for pizza at 3:15.

 


Past notices:

3_14_11.html

3_7_11.html

2_28_11.html

2_21_11.html

2_14_11.html

2_7_11.html

1_31_11.html

1_24_11.html

1_17_11.html

winter break

11_22_10.html

11_15_10.html

11_8_10.html

11_1_10.html

10_25_10.html

10_18_10.html

10_11_10.html

10_4_10.html

9_27_10.html

9_20_10.html

9_13_10.html

9_6_10.html

8_30_10.html

8_23_10.html

Seminars from 2009-2010 academic year

Seminars from 2008-2009 academic year

Seminars from 2007-2008 academic year

Seminars from 2006-2007 academic year

Seminars from 2005-2006 academic year